Cuyahoga County Planning Commission

Cuyahoga County Greenprint
Technical Guide


The Interactive Greenprint's Map Layers are broken into several sets of groups. The map layers are listed in their drawing order, from bottom to top, which provides for the best possible depiction of these interrelated features. Generally, layers are grouped into categories that are indicated with CAPITAL LETTERS. Lower case layer names are typically single layers, with a few exceptions.

Click on a layer name (below) to get more details:

 

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS

Map Layers
Layer names and controls can be seen by picking the layer stack button in the lower left corner of the side panel:Map Layers

(You may have to expand the side panel using the arrow (Arrow) next to the 'I want to...' menu button.)

You can also select 'Change visible map layers' from the 'I want to...' menu.

Layers are shown in a hierarchy of groupings. At the top level is "Operational Layers", under which all other layers reside. Plus sign (+) symbols to the left of a group or layer indicate that more layers or more detail is available below that level. Click this symbol to expand the grouping and the minus sign (-) to collapse the grouping. Individual layers or groups of layers can be toggled on and off with the check-box. Most of the "Greenprint" layer groupings are denoted by CAPITAL LETTERS, while individual layers are typically lower case.

Some layers feature a "slider bar" (Slider) to the right of the layer name. This tool provides the ability to alter the transparency of the layer.

The size of the side panel can be adjusted by selecting and dragging the arrow (Arrow) next to the 'I want to...' menu button.

Panel Action Menu

At the top of the side panel is a context menu button(Menu). The contents of this menu change depending on what is displayed in the side panel:

  • Layer List: When the Layer List is displayed, the menu gives a 'Show Legend' option. Click 'Show Legend' to see the Legend of visible layers.

  • Results List: After performing an Identify, Query, or Global Search, the menu gives multiple options:

    • Switch to Table: View the results in a table along the bottom of the viewer. Use the context menu of the table to return to List View

    • Show Buffer Options: Apply a buffer to the selected features to create a new selection

    • Export: Export the results in a variety of formats.

  • Details: When viewing a particular feature's details, the menu gives multiple options:

    • Show Expanded View: View the details in a panel along the bottom of the viewer. Use the context menu of Expanded View to return to Compact View.

    • Show Buffer Options: Apply a buffer around the selected feature to create a new selection

    • Zoom to Feature: Zoom to the feature in the map.

    • Pan: Pan the map to center on the feature.

    • Previous Extent: Return the map view to the previous extent.

Search box

In the upper right corner is a search box for finding places on the map. The search function can be used in three different ways:

  • Parcel ID: Enter the permanent parcel number with no dashes (e.g., 12345678)

  • Specific addresses: Enter the street number, street, and city (e.g., 101 Main St Cleveland)

  • Streets: Enter the street, city, and state (e.g., Main St Cleveland OH)

Click the magnifying glass (Search) or hit 'Enter' on your keyboard to begin the search.
Search results will appear in the panel to the left of the map and be marked with a blue pushpin icon in the map.
(You may have to expand the side panel using the arrow (Arrow) next to the 'I want to...' menu button.)
Pick the best match from the list to zoom to its location. Selected results will be highlighted in yellow.

'I want to...' Menu

A variety of tasks are available within the 'I want to...' menu. Simply click the blue button to see your options:

  • Learn about enhancing our greenspace: Opens the CCPC's Greenprint website in a new tab or window.

  • View the home panel: Open the Home Panel to see information about the application.

  • Find data on the map: Click on the map to Identify features.

  • Change visible map layers: Open the Layer List to turn layers on and off, perform layer actions, and view the legend.

  • Return to initial map extent: Show the map at the initial view extent.

  • Print a map: Open the print dialogue.

  • Feedback: Opens the CCPC's Contact form in a new tab or window.

  • Bookmark current map extent: Adds the current map extent to the list of bookmarks.

Tools

A variety of tools are available by clicking on the tools button (Tools) in the upper right corner of the map. See the Tools section of this document for more detailed information on each of the available tools.

Results

The Identify tools, the Query tool, and the Global Search return results.

These results are displayed in the side panel to the left of the map.

  • You may have to expand the side panel using the arrow (Arrow) next to the 'I want to...' menu button.
  • Alternatively, a tabular data view can be displayed by using the Panel Action Menu button (Menu) and selecting 'Switch to Table'.
  • Clicking on a result in the list will show more detail and the map will zoom to the feature.
  • Use the results navigation tools at the bottom of the side panel to cycle through multiple pages of results, if necessary.
  • The Panel Action Menu button (Menu) will show actions specific to the results.

Map Layers


Addresses and Locations

This is a pre-defined "group" of layers provided by the Cuyahoga County GIS Department:

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


Transportation

This is a pre-defined "group" of layers provided by the Cuyahoga County GIS Department, including depictions of roads, railroads, and other transportation features. Varying amounts of detail are available depending on the map scale.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


POLITICAL

The following layers are provided by the Cuyahoga County GIS Department.

Municipalities

This layer displays names and boundaries of Cuyahoga County communities.

School Districts

This layer shows the names and shaded polygons for school districts in Cuyahoga County

Council Districts

The 11 districts of Cuyahoga County Council are shown as shaded polygons in this layer.

County Boundary

This shows the boundary of Cuyahoga County, excluding the portion in Lake Erie.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


LAND STATUS

This is a layer group consisting of two individual layers:

Probable Vacant Lot

Description

The Probable Vacant Lot layer is maintained by Case Western Reserve University as part of its NEOCANDO/NST data warehouse. "Vacant" in this context means an individual parcel without a structure. In addition to using County Fiscal Office appraisal records for a land use type of "vacant", this data set incorporates other indicators, such as demolition permits (Cleveland only), and building value = $0. Since some of those indicators are not certain, the data set includes the disclaimer of "probable" vacant.

Source

Accessed through NEO CANDO data information system, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. The data is currently updated on a weekly basis by NEO CANDO.

Conservation Easements

Description:

Conservation easements are legal restrictions on use for a particular property of portion thereof. Some common easements are for underground utilities, or the portion of a front yard within the public right-of-way (aka, tree lawns). Conservation easements typically restrict development in perpetuity on a portion of land while the land owner continues to hold the benefits of owning the land. In addition, conservation easements often provide tax benefits to the owner.

Source

The National Conservation Easement Database (NCED) is a nationwide compilation conservation easements. The NCED relies on voluntary data submittals by participating organizations, and therefore does not include all conservation easements in our area.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


Activity Nodes

activity nodes image

Description

Generalized areas that serve as of concentrations of activity, including employment, retail, and civic centers. These nodes often serve as origin/destination points for trails.

Another way in which the Greenprint can serve as an organizing element for revitalization and development in the County is by creating attractive, safe and user-friendly routes which link the county's system of green corridors to other activity centers within the County. Most communities have civic complexes, recreation centers, historic downtowns or other cultural or educational institutions which are central to community life and important to forming the area's image.

Source

Cuyahoga County Planning Commission, 2014. Developed as part of the original Cuyahoga County Greenprint, with ongoing updates.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


GREENPRINT FEATURES

Most (but not all) of the layers in the Greenprint Viewer application are located underneath the "GREENPRINT FEATURES" group. Other layers are outside of this group for either technical or categorical reasons.

Open Space

open space example image

Description

Cuyahoga County Open Space Inventory consists of public and institutionally owned open space. Four general types are depicted:

The Open Space Inventory does not necessarily include conservation easements on privately held lands.

Source

Cuyahoga County Open Space Inventory, 2014. Cuyahoga County Planning Commission. Originally developed as part of a multi-county inventory, the Cuyahoga County portion has been continually maintained and improved by the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission. The Open Space Inventory has been expanded in recent years to include smaller, but integral open spaces, including all of the City of Cleveland's municipal parks and recreation centers. Other contributing partners have been Cleveland Metroparks and the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, each providing detailed map data of their holdings.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


Trails and Bikeway Plan

map of county trail network

Description

Bikeways and All-purpose trails, both existing and proposed. The inventory depicted on the Greenprint Viewer was assembled through the Trails Leadership Network - a bikeway coordination committee of leading trail planning and transportation organizations in the region.

Trails are depicted on the map according to their Status and Type:

Status:

Type:

Source

Trails Leadership Network, including the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission, Cleveland Metroparks, Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA), City of Cleveland, and various other municipalities and organizations.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top


WATERSHEDS

watersheds example image

The Watersheds layer group provides two depictions of local watersheds:

Generally speaking, a watershed is the area of land that drains into a lake or stream. Watersheds can be small - like the area that drains into the creek behind your house. Or, watersheds can be large - consider all the land, streams and rivers that drain into the Ohio River or Lake Erie. (Ohio EPA)

The watersheds shown here are those that are a manageable size for local watershed stewardship groups, such as Friends of Euclid Creek or Doan Brook Watershed Partnership. Each of the parent watershed stewards can be contacted through hyperlinks available in the map.

Each are described in more detail below:

Local Watersheds

Description

The watersheds as depicted here generally correspond to level 12 of the National Hydrography Dataset, and have been modified slightly for local naming conventions and groupings. The watersheds shown here are those that are a manageable size for local watershed stewardship groups, such as "Friends of Euclid Creek", or "Doan Brook Watershed Partnership". Each of the parent watershed stewards can be contacted through hyperlinks available in the map.

Source

Ohio Department of Natural Resources, c. 2001; Modified by the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission.

Local Watersheds, by Percent Impervious

Description

The same watersheds are depicted according to the percentage of their land area that is impervious in nature - in other words, covered by asphalt, buildings, and other hard-packed surface that prevents precipitation from naturally flowing along and into the ground.

The Center for Watershed Protection (http://www.cwp.org) has developed a series of manuals with guidelines and practices for watersheds that correspond their degree of impervious cover. The shadings and groupings used in the Greenprint Viewer correspond to the guidelines in 'Urban Subwatershed Restoration Manual Series Manual 1: An Integrated Framework to Restore Small Urban Watersheds.' (see page 37), which is available through the CWP's online library.

Sources

Ohio Department of Natural Resources, c. 2001; National Land Cover Dataset, 2006.

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WATER FEATURES

water features example image

Description

Cuyahoga County is served by four major water features, sometimes referred to as "spines" in a local network: the three major river valleys of the Rocky, Cuyahoga and Chagrin Rivers, and the lakeshore of Lake Erie. Tributaries to these spines typically reach from upland headwaters, down through a variety of dense urban land uses, and ultimately to Lake Erie.

Three types of features are depicted in separate sub-layers:

Wetlands are represented in a separate layer.

Source

Water features were compiled from two sources. Streams and Water Bodies were digitized from 2006 aerial photography by Cuyahoga County. Enhancements to those data sets were provided by Cleveland Metroparks. Stream names (labels) and a representation of underground stream connections were provided by the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD, 2011), a product of the US Geologic Survey. Local data provides the highest level of graphic detail, while the NHD provides a complex national network of water features, including names (where known) and modeling of water flow.

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WETLANDS

wetlands example image

Description

Existing wetlands are depicted from two available sources, each in its own sub-layer. Wetland features from these two well-recognized inventories often overlap and vary in their coverage, due to varying methodologies and time. Each has a different set of characteristics, as well.

Sources

National Wetlands Inventory (NWI): The National Wetlands Inventory is a collection of inventories conducted throughout the United States under the direction of the US Fish & Wildlife Service. In Ohio, Ducks Unlimited, serving as a consultant to the US Fish & Wildlife Service, resurveyed wetlands throughout the State in 2009. For a detailed report on the data collection process, see Updating the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) for Ohio (PDF).

The Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD) contracted with Davey Resources Group for two GIS-based surveys. The first was conducted in 2000 in the Cuyahoga River watershed (within Cuyahoga County). In 2006, a second GIS-based inventory was conducted for the balance of the county. The purpose of these studies was to provide general information on the locations and sizes of wetlands. The study authors advise that the inventories should not be used in place of a wetlands determination and/or delineation. If detailed size and wetlands boundary information is required, a proper wetlands delineation, including a wetlands boundary survey, should be performed by a qualified wetlands specialist. For the full report, see the GIS Wetlands Inventory and Restoration Assessment (PDF).

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WATER FEATURE CORRIDORS
water feature corridors example image

Description

Riparian zones are areas alongside rivers, streams, wetlands and shorelines.

There are several indicators available to help identify riparian zones. Two methods are used in the Cuyahoga County Greenprint:

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PRIORITY PROTECTION AREAS

priority protection areas example image

Description

The "Priority Protection Areas" layer group includes two individual layers - each of which identifies areas designated by ecological experts and/or community planners as being high priority areas for conservation or protection.

Priority Conservation Areas (PCAs)

Priority Conservation areas are identified within Balanced Growth Plans that have been approved by local communities and endorsed by the Ohio EPA under its Ohio Balanced Growth Program. Four approved plans have been completed in portions of Cuyahoga County: Big Creek Watershed, Chagrin River Watershed, Chippewa Creek Watershed, and Furnace Run Watershed.

More specifically, a PCA consists of locally designated areas for protection and restoration that may be critically important as ecological, recreational, heritage, agricultural, and public access areas, significant for their contribution to water quality and general quality of life. Optionally, agricultural areas may be designated as Priority Agricultural Areas (PAA).

There is no change in the owner's property rights and the property is still subject to local land-use regulation. The land may be eligible for state incentives to support and encourage its use as a desirable area for conservation. State public policy decisions recognize the potential for conservation use, and the state would not encourage or provide funding for development within the area.

For more information, see the Ohio Balanced Growth Program's Frequently Asked Questions (PDF)

Priority Protection Catchments

Several sub-watersheds ("catchments") were identified by Cleveland Metroparks in their Emerald Necklace Centennial Plan (2012). Each of these areas is adjacent or in close proximity to Metroparks land, as part of its strategy to "Designate sensitive, contiguous natural resource areas as core zones for priority conservation attention."

Within the Greenprint Viewer, a user can click on a particular protection area and then click on a hyperlink to read the narrative for that area directly from the Centennial Plan.

Sources

Priority Conservation Areas

Priority Protection Catchments

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Census Block Demographics

 

Description

Census Blocks are generally the smallest geographic unit available from the U.S. Census Bureau, often representing literal city blocks in urbanized areas, and larger extents in suburban and rural areas. Demographic data for these smallest geographic units are available only from the decennial census, most recently the 2010 Census. Demographics include population by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin, as well as Housing Occupancy.

Within the Greenprint, these demographic indicators can be accessed for individual blocks or in groups by using Query tools such as Polygon or Rectangle. Users might also collect demographics by using the Buffer Options found in the context menu for Query results panel (after searching for other features).

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 TIGER/Line Shapefiles; and 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171)Summary File.

For general information on the Census, see the U.S. Census Bureau.

For local Census data, see the County Planning Commission Census Page.

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LAND COVER/TREE CANOPY

 

Land Cover

land cover example image

Description

Land Cover can generally be considered as the vegetation, water, natural and man-made surface of the earth. This particular land cover layer was developed as the basis for the County's 2013 Urban Tree Canopy Assessment (UTC). This high resolution land cover is far more detailed than traditionally available sources such as the National Land Cover Dataset.

High resolution land cover data can be a key tool in not only "seeing", but also measuring natural resource patterns, especially in a densely built urban environment such found in most of Cuyahoga County. The land cover layer can be used as an easily understood "base" when highlighting green infrastructure issues. As part of the County's UTC study, the land cover data was further analyzed and summarized by various geographic levels, including city, neighborhood, and parcel levels. See the URBAN TREE CANOPY METRICS layer group for more detail on these geographic summaries.

The classification system for the 10-class land cover dataset are:

  1. Grass/Shrub: Grass and low-lying shrubs
  2. Bare Earth: exposed dirt, including beaches, baseball infields, and some agricultural fields.
  3. Water: Visible water features
  4. Buildings: Includes exposed houses and buildings. Generally excludes garages and other smaller structures.
  5. Road / Railroad: Exposed pavement within the public right of way, as well as railroad beds.
  6. Other paved surfaces: Exposed pavement within private property. Typically includes parking lots and private roadways.
  7. Tree Canopy over vegetation or soil: Tree canopy extending over vegetation or bare earth
  8. Tree Canopy over building: Tree canopy extending over buildings
  9. Tree Canopy over road/railroad: Tree canopy extending over road / railroad
  10. Tree Canopy over other paved surfaces: Tree canopy extending over other paved surfaces.

As measured in the UTC study, "Tree Canopy" includes classes 8, 9, 10, and 11.

Source

Cuyahoga County Planning Commission Urban Tree Canopy Assessment, 2013. The UTC land cover analysis was developed through the integration of several data sources - primarily from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) 2011, 4-band aerial imagery, US Department of Agriculture; as well as additional imagery, LIDAR elevation data, and other local data sources.

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Forest Patches

forest patches example image

Description

The Forest Patch layer was developed by the University of Vermont's Spatial Analysis Laboratory, derived from the Cuyahoga County Urban Tree Canopy (UTC) Assessment of 2013. "Patches" of forest were extracted and then generalized from the highly detailed land cover data developed in the UTC study. A simple classification scheme was then developed to characterize those patches, primarily by size. The classification scheme is geared towards ultimately identifying habitat planting areas "where the establishment of new tree canopy would help to improve wildlife habitat by expanding existing large patches of tree canopy by connecting them with smaller spaces".

Existing patches are classified as:

These size thresholds may vary based on the shape of the patches themselves. For instance, "Large" patches that are long and narrow might be downgraded to a "Medium" patch size.

Source

University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Laboratory and Cuyahoga County Planning Commission, 2014. Derived from Urban Tree Canopy Assessment, 2013.

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URBAN TREE CANOPY METRICS

urban tree canopy example image

Description

The URBAN TREE CANOPY METRICS layer group includes four individual layers that summarize existing and potential tree canopy, as identified in the County's 2013 Urban Tree Canopy Assessment (UTC):

*Right-of-way summaries are for continuous sections of street right-of-way that share the same name within a municipality.

Each layer provides a thematic summary of percentage of total land cover for any given area.

Source

Cuyahoga County Planning Commission Urban Tree Canopy Assessment, 2013.

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TOPOGRAPHY

The TOPOGRAPHY layer group contains two layers: Elevation Contours and Steep Slope. Each provides insights into the shape and elevation of the ground's surface.

Elevation Contours

elevation contours example image

Description

Elevation contours are linear representations of elevation. When the layer is enabled, contour lines will appear on the Greenprint as users zoom in closely enough to see the detailed line work.

Each continuous line represents a particular elevation value, and the lines are spaced at two-foot elevation intervals. Thicker index lines represent intervals of 10 feet, and are automatically labeled with their elevation value. To find the elevation value of any particular line, users can count individual lines and add or subtract two feet towards the next index line. Alternatively, users can use the identify tool to click on a given line and find its elevation value.

Contour lines that are spaced more closely together indicate steeper slopes, as elevation changes more rapidly. Conversely, flatter areas will have very few lines in a given area, and may not show a distinct pattern.

Dashed elevation lines represent depressions. Contours will often form circular patterns, such as around all sides of a hill. In that simple case, it is assumed that contour lines inside of others are rising in elevation. Often times, however, closed depressions will occur around ponds, wetlands, or other such features.

Other contextual clues can help in reading contour lines and the associated terrain. The Shaded Relief layer (at the bottom of the layer list) represents shadows cast from a virtual sun shining from the northwest. Also, water features will generally occur at relatively lower elevations, and may cause contour lines to stretch out in the downhill direction of the water's flow.

Elevation contours can also be used to effectively calculate slope (steepness) along a given path by dividing the change in elevation by the horizontal distance between any two points.

Source

Elevation contours were developed by Cuyahoga County from a 2006 aerial photography project. See Cuyahoga County GIS Data.

Steep Slopes

steep slope example image
steep slope example image

Description

Steep Slope is a layer that depicts land having a percentage slope greater than 12%, shown in two classes: 12-18% and 18.1% or more.

Slope is measured as rise over run, and is depicted here in percentage classes. For example, a stretch of land 100 feet long that rises fifteen feet in elevation has a slope of fifteen percent (15/100).

Planning and conservation literature cites varying definitions for "steep" slope. Considerations include soil type, land cover, and allowable landscape techniques. Hillside protection ordinances likewise cite varying standards, and often include slope-density standards that limit the density of development according to the degree of slope.

Source

Steep slope data was developed by the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission from a digital elevation model provided by the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program, 2006.

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BASE MAPS

The following layers are provided by the Cuyahoga County GIS Department. In addition to the usual layer control in the left pane, users can also use the Base Maps Widget button in the lower left corner of the map to quickly change the underlying basemap between each of these layers. By using the basic layer control, users have a bit more flexibility to show, for instance, parcels in combination with any year's aerial photography.

Parcels

The Parcels layer provides a general-purpose reference for parcel boundaries and identity. Similar to other layers, users can choose the Identify tool (found in the Basic Tools menu) to get more information on a particular parcel. Users can click within a parcel and then get further details, including a link to property records available throughout the County's new MyPlace application (currently in beta testing).

Aerial Photography

Currently, users can choose from 7 years of aerial photography. Multiple years can be shown at once with careful use of the transparency slider bars (see General Instructions).

Shaded Relief

Composed of two sources, the Shaded Relief is a representation of elevation data using a hillshading effect. The highest level is a service provided by the USGS and was created using the National Elevation Dataset. The remaining levels are from a service created by Cuyahoga County using a Digital Elevation Model provided by the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program.

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Tools

Click on a tool to learn more information:

Basic Tools


Home

Opens the Home Panel


Identify

Activates the Identify tool


Initial View

Return to initial map extent


Print

Create a printable version of the map


Export

Save a map image


Share

Share the current map on social media


Pictometry

Display Pictometry imagery

Home: Open the Home Panel.

Identify: Activates the Identify tool. Clicking in the map frame will identify all visible features and list them in the Identify Results pane. When this tool is active, the Identify Options menu appears. Use this menu to enable or disable buffering (a buffer appears around the Identified point, everything within the buffer will be identified) and to select identifiable layers.

Initial View: Returns the map view to the extent visible when the viewer initially loaded.

Print: Opens the print dialogue, which allows you to create a printable version of the map with a legend, scale, and customizable title.

Export: Creates an image file from the map view in a variety of formats. Some formats allow for the inclusion of georefernce/location data that will allow you to view the image

Share: Opens the Share dialogue, allowing you to share a link to the viewer on the most common Social Media platforms. The current map extent and layer visibility is recorded in the link when the Share button is clicked.

Pictometry: Displays Pictometry imagery in a separate viewing pane at the bottom of the map. This pane can be resized or moved to it's own tab or window. It also has it's own set of navigation tools and is synced to the purple marker on the viewer's map. Moving the purple marker in the map will move the Pictometry view and moving the Pictometry view will move the purple marker. If you lose track of the marker's position, you can reset the Pictometry view using the 'Center this map to the viewer' button in the upper right corner of the Pictometry pane.

Tools | Basic Tools | Navigation | Measurement and Markup | Identify and Query | Top


Navigation


Pan

Enter pan mode


Zoom In

Click on the map to zoom in


Zoom Out

Click on the map to zoom out


Initial View

Return to initial map extent


Full Extent

Return to the full extent of the map


Previous Extent

Zoom to the previous extent


Next Extent

Zoom to the next extent


Bookmarks

Opens the bookmarks view

Pan: Cancels any active tools and enters pan mode. Click and drag the mouse to pan around the map.

Zoom In: Click on the map to zoom in at that point. Click and drag a rectangle to zoom to that area.

Zoom Out: Click on the map to zoom out at that point. Click and drag a rectangle to zoom out from that area.

Initial View: Returns the map view to the extent visible when the viewer initially loaded.

Full Extent: Zooms to the full extent of all layers in the visibility map. (Not all layers display at all scale levels or extents)

Previous Extent: Zooms to the previous extent. Button will remain active as long as their is a previous extent to zoom to. Use this button in conjunction with the Next Extent button to cycle through extents.

Next Extent: Zooms to the next extent. Button will remain active as long as their is a next extent to zoom to. Use this button in conjunction with the Previous Extent button to cycle through extents.

Bookmarks: Opens the bookmarks view that contains a list of predefined bookmarks. The bottom of the list contains a button to add your own bookmark.

Tools | Basic Tools | Navigation | Measurement and Markup | Identify and Query | Top


Measurement and Markup

All measurements are approximate.


Distance

Measure a distance


Area

Measure an area


Point

Place a point on the map


Text

Add text to the map


Line

Draw a line on the map


Freehand

Draw a freehand line on the map


Ellipse

Draw an ellipse on the map


Circle

Draw a circle on the map


Polygon

Draw a polygon on the map


Rectangle

Draw a rectangle on the map


Edit Drawing

Edit existing markup or measurements

Distance: Draw a multi-part line to measure a distance. Click once to start the line, click once to get a measurement for a distance, click twice to finish the markup measurement and get a total. Distances appear on each segment. When the tool is active, the Measure Options appear in the toolbar: set units, enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers. Next to the Measurement Options is the Measure Tool selection which is used to set the tool type: line (straight point to point, click between points), freehand (freehand tracing, click and hold to trace). Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Area: Draw a shape to measure an area. Click once to start the shape, click to add a vertex/point to the shape, click twice (double-click) to finish the markup measurement and get area and perimeter totals. Distances appear on each line section of the shape and area and perimeter appear in the middle of the shape. When the tool is active, the Measure Options appear in the toolbar: set units, enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers. Next to the Measurement Options is the Measure Tool selection which is used to set the tool type: freehand shape (freehand tracing, click and hold to trace), ellipse (click and drag to adjust shape), circle (click and drag to adjust shape, polygon (click at each vertex/point in the shape), rectangle (click and drag to adjust shape). Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Point: Click on the map to place a point markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers, select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Text: Click on the map where you want your text markup, then enter your text in the text box. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers, select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups (such as rotating text), erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Line: Click once to start the line, click again to add vertices/points along the line, click twice to finish and create the line markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers, select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Freehand: Click and drag to draw, release to create the line markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Ellipse: Click and drag to place and adjust the shape, release to create the ellipse markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Circle: Click and drag to place and adjust the size, release to create the circle markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Polygon: Click once to start the polygon, click again to add vertices/points along the polygon, click twice to finish and create the polygon markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers, select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Rectangle: Click and drag to place and adjust the size, release to create the rectangle markup. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers, select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes. Use the Edit Drawings tool to adjust drawn measurements or markups, erase certain measurements or markups, or clear all measurements and markups.

Edit Drawing: Click the dropdown below the button image to select the type of edit. When the tool is active, the Markup Options appear in the toolbar: enable or disable snapping and set snapping layers, select markup style from a variety of colors and shapes.

Tools | Basic Tools | Navigation | Measurement and Markup | Identify and Query | Top


Identify and Query

Activating an Identify tool opens the Identify Options Menu. Use this menu to enable or disable buffering (a buffer appears around the Identify shape, everything within the buffer will be identified), enable or disable snapping, select snapping layers, and select identifiable layers. Please not that not all Identify Options are available for every Identify Tool.


Point

Identify at a point


Freehand

Identify with a freehand shape


Line

Identify with a line


Polygon

Identify with a polygon


Rectangle

Identify with a rectangle


Query

Perform an advanced query


Filter

Apply a filter to one or more layers

Point: Identify all visible features at a specific point. Identify Results appear in the side panel.

Freehand: Identify all visible features that touch a drawn freehand markup. Click and drag to draw, release to create the freehand markup. Identify Results appear in the side panel.

Line: Identify all visible features that touch a drawn line markup. Click once to start the line, click again to add vertices/points along the line, click twice to finish and create the line markup. Identify Results appear in the side panel.

Polygon: Identify all visible features that touch a drawn polygon markup. Click once to start the shape, click again to add vertices/points along the shape, click twice to finish and create the polygon markup. Identify Results appear in the side panel.

Rectangle: Identify all visible features that touch a drawn rectangle markup. Click and drag to place and adjust the size, release to create the rectangle markup. Identify Results appear in the side panel.

Query: Opens the Query dialogue in the side panel. Select a layer to perform the query on from available layers in the Layer dropdown menu. Form your query using the dropdowns for FIELD, OPERATOR, and VALUE boxes. Click the 'Add Another Condition' to add more conditions to your query. Set the Spatial Filter to 'None' (default) or 'Current Extent' (limit selections to features currently within the map frame). Click 'Search' to apply the query. Query Results appear in the side panel.

Filter: Opens the Filter dialogue in the side panel. Select a layer to apply the filter to from available layers in the Layer dropdown menu. Form your filter using the dropdowns for FIELD, OPERATOR, and VALUE boxes. Click the 'Add Another Condition' to add more conditions to your filter. Set the Spatial Filter to 'None' (default) or 'Current Extent' (limit selections to features currently within the map frame). Click 'Filter' to apply your filter. Use the layer dropdown to filter another layer. Filters remain applied to a layer until they are cleared from that layer.

Tools | Basic Tools | Navigation | Measurement and Markup | Identify and Query | Top

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top



Frequently Asked Questions

 

Q. Nothing happened when I made a made a selection in the viewer. What happened?
A. In order to use certain features, including links to MyPlace and making a printable map, you must enable pop-up windows for the viewer in your browser. Please consult your browser's documentation for instructions on enabling pop-ups (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari).

Q. Why can't I see the layer(s) that I have turned on?
A. There are several reasons. Most often its because you are zoomed out too far. Several layers, like parcels, will not show up until you zoom in to a reasonable scale. Another reason may be that the layer's parent group is turned off. For instance, the Municipalities layer will not show if the POLITICAL group is turned off. Lastly, some layers may be displayed underneath others, but that possibility has largely been eliminated.

Q. The colors on the map don't match the colors in the legend. Why?
A. Many of the layers are semi-transparent (e.g., Open Space by Type or Watersheds), so you may be seeing through it another layer. Try turning off layers that may be conflicting with the one in question. Also, there is a transparency slider control to the right of some layers. Try moving the slider to the right (less transparent) or to the left (more transparent).

Q. I've selected a feature with one of the query tools, and it's highlighted in yellow. How do I unselect it in order to remove the highlighting?
A. Click the left-facing arrow in the side panel to the left of the parcel number, or click the query tool where there are no features to make a new selection, such as in the road right-of-way.

Q. How can I get current Fiscal Office data for a given parcel?
A. When clicking on a parcel with the Identify tool (or other tools), you may see: "For more information regarding this parcel, please visit MyPlace." Click the hyperlink for MyPlace, and a new browser tab will open up for the Fiscal Office MyPlace page for that parcel. Each subsequent selection of a MyPlace hyperlink will open up an additional browser tab. If you are interested in exploring a specific area, it may be worthwhile to continue in one MyPlace tab, rather than having the Greenprint Viewer generate multiple tabs.

Q. Can I save my query results to a spreadsheet?
A. Yes. After selecting one or more features, click on the "Switch to Table" button immediately below the results list. From the table view at the bottom of the page, pick the layer's results that you are interested in from the tabs. Then select the text in the table, using either your left mouse button or shift+right arrow keys to select the text. Copy and paste the selection to Excel or other software.

Q. When printing a map, what "Map Scale" should I pick?
A. Since your screen layout will not likely match exactly with the paper size chosen for your output, you will have to decide if it's more important to preserve the map scale as-is (current scale) or whether the outer extent of the map is more important (current extent). There are other preset scale options as well, which are all expressed in a "proportional scale", For example: 1:1,000 = 1 inch to 1,000 inches.

Below are some standard scales:

ProportionFeet/inch
1:24,0002,000
1:12,0001,000
1:6,000500
1:3,000250
1:1,200100
1:60050

The printer-friendly map will have a graphic scale bar in the lower left corner and proportionate scale text in the lower right corner. Note that the scale text will be incorrect if the print is enlarged or reduced in any way.

Q. Can I use the viewer on my smartphone or tablet?
A. Yes. The application can be viewed through any HTML5 compatible browser, and uses responsive design, whereby the map and its controls will be adjusted for a smaller mobile or tablet screen layout. Also, the cross-hair button in the upper left of the map will provide geolocation options that can employ your device's GPS.

Q. How do I get back to the view I was looking at before?
A. Click the tool icon at the top right to bring up the tool tabs, and select the Navigation tab. Click the button labeled "Previous Extent". You may also use the context menu button(Menu) in the side panel. You can go back through several previous extents and forward through "Next Extents" in your recently viewed areas.

Q. Can I use Greenprint layers in my own mapping application?
A. Yes. Most layers are available for download from the Cuyahoga County GIS Department. Various web map services are also available; contact the Cuyahoga County GIS Department for details.

If you have a question that's not covered above, please contact us about your issue.

Map Layers | Base Maps | Tools | FAQ | Top